Should / Shouldn’t (giving advice)

doctor
photo: pixabay.com

Here’s a prescription template that you can print and use in the classroom. If you’re teaching primary students, this might come in handy in a lesson on how to give advice using SHOULD and SHOULDN’T.

Pair up students and have them role play a doctor-patient dialogue using this prescription template to guide them.

Download printable here: Prescription.

Happy teaching!

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Make Giant Dice

Make Giant DiceToday I’m hosting an activity shared by education.com. It looks great for kindergarten kids who are learning to count and read numbers. Take a look. Have you tried it already?

Why Dice?

Dice are the main feature of lots of “grownup” games, but guess what? They’re a big part of kindergarten, too, and they can be great for learning. In early grades, kids often use dice as they learn both to count and to read number words. The dots on each side of the die give a clear visual picture of what each number represents, and kids can easily see the “one to one correspondence” between abstract numbers and the concrete things they show. At the same time, kids also need to match numbers to words, so that if they see “one,” or “two,” they can instantly recognize what they’re seeing. Here’s a great activity to put it all together—and create a marvelous game piece for outdoor play while you’re at it.

What You Need:
Clean, empty ½ gallon milk cartons
Hobby knife, such as an X-Acto knife
Tape
Round white stickers (available at office supply stores)
Black permanent marker
Craft glue
Clear contact paper
Construction paper

What You Do:
1. First, use the knife to cut off the bottom of your milk carton to create a cube that is exactly as high as it is wide.
2. Cut the slanted top off the remaining part of the milk carton, and cut a slit in one corner of the four-sided column that remains. Flatten the sides, and cut a long strip.
3. Wrap the strip around the open top of your milk carton, and tape it securely on all exposed sides.
4. Now measure and cut your construction paper into two strips that are three “squares” long and one square high.
5. Glue the strips onto the cubes.
6. Now, you have a blank die. Have your kindergartner help you write the word for each number along a corresponding side of the die, from “one” to “six.” Then have her paste on the corresponding number of stickers.
7. Cover the whole cube with clear contact paper, and make sure you reinforce all seams. You will have an all-weather, all-fun die that you can use for all sorts of games, and all sorts of math and reading, too.

Make Dice 1

Thanks again to education.com for sharing this activity. For more reading activities, take a look here: https://www.education.com/games/ela/reading.

Happy learning!

Weather flashcards (VYLs)

rainyHello again! Hope your spring break was awesome! And relaxing! And sunny!: )

It’s back to school here tomorrow and to help you prepare, especially if you’re teaching VYLs, my teacher friend (and my VYL go-to expert) Eugenia  has come up with four lovely weather flashcards to help keep the little kids engaged while talking about the atmospheric conditions: ).

Click below to download (.pdf version):
rainysnowysunnywindy.

So if you’re thinking of teaching “windy”, “rainy”, “sunny” and “snowy”, these cute cards may be of help. Also, the kids can name the character in the flashcards, and they can describe his clothes and other extra features (what he is holding or where he is or how he’s feeling or how he looks like).

As usual, any feedback is more than welcome!:)

Have fun teaching! 🏫✍🏼 ☕️✏️📚

Sharing is caring!

*Vectors source: http://www.freepik.com/

What’s the matter?

PhotoHere’s a prescription printable that you can use for doctor-patient role-plays with Movers. There’s two of them on one page so hopefully that helps with the printing.

Download the handout here: Prescription.

It’s a pretty basic form but it will help the “doctors” ask the right questions and give and record the advice.

Structures that could be used in the lesson:
What’s your name?
How old are you?
What’s your address?
What’s the matter?
Where does it hurt?
Here are some pills for…
You should eat/drink/exercise…

I have some plastic stethoscopes (like the one in the photo above) that I usually use for this kind of lesson. The kids love them and they have a lot of fun giving consultations.

Hope you find this useful.
Have fun teaching!
👩‍🏫

I wish…

TeachingGamesEFL.com - by Mike Astbury

This is an adaptable freer practice activity which I have used when teaching various grammar structures. In this example we’re looking at ‘I wish…’ with the past simple.

I have Jane-Maria Harding da Rosa to thank for this activity. She adapted an idea from teaching grammar creatively. Students use pictures and personalised sentences to produce memorable examples of the target language. I’ve written a brief lesson plan to set up the activity.

I wish 4.jpg “I wish I was a celebrity.”

Lesson plan / set up

For the lead in I wrote a few wishes of my own on the board with gaps and told the class “These sentences are about me. What words are missing?”:

My computer’s broken. I ______ I ______ a new laptop.
I loved visiting Berlin. I ______ I ______ still on holiday.
I’m not very musical. I ______ I ______ play the guitar.
I want to go…

View original post 611 more words

How was your spring break? (minicards)

spring break
Photo: Pixabay

So how was your Easter? Did you go on an egg hunt? Was the weather nice? Did you make any new friends? Did you travel abroad? Hope you answered yes to all those questions; ).

Spring break will be over soon here in Romania so here’s a handout (editable) with mini-cards to help your kids chat about their Easter holiday. You can use it with your Movers and Flyers: SpringBrkQs. Feel free to change some of the questions if they don’t suit your learners. And let me know if you think of new questions that I could add to the template.

Another cool idea for a post spring break chat is this Find Someone Who activity. It’s free and seems guaranteed to make the kids walk and talk. It’s also a great way to practise past forms.

That’s it for now. Enjoy your spring wherever you are! 🌼🌼🌼

Like&share, please! 🙂 Any feedback is more than welcome!

Ice Age: The Great Egg-Scapade handouts

The_Great_Egg-Scapade
Photo source: iceage.wikia.com

We’re celebrating Easter on Sunday here in Romania so this week is all about Easter-related activities.

Ice Age: The Great Egg-Scapade is only 20 minutes or so so you can fit it nicely into one of your lessons this week. Here’s the trailer.

To get kids more familiar with the characters, use this handout: EggScapadeCharacters. It’s a simple matching exercise and it helps them remember/learn the names of the animals in the story. Then you can have them guess the order in which certain events happen using this handout: OrderEvents. You can cut the stripes of paper beforehand or have them cut them in class. After they watch the short film, they check to see if they guessed the right order.

I also came up with some questions especially for my KET students (they’re quite strong learners). You can find them below:

  1. Who’s your favourite Ice Age character? Why?
  2. Imagine you lived in the Ice Age. What would you wear? What would you eat? Where would you live?
  3. Would you rather be more like Manny or more like Diego? Why?
  4. Have you ever seen an egg hatching?
  5. Have you ever been on an egg hunt? How many eggs did you find?

I hope you’ll find all this useful. I’d love to get any feedback on the handouts.

Like&share!

🌱🌱🌱