Happy World Book Day!🤓📚📖

Here’s how you can celebrate it in class:


– World Book character selfies – students draw their selfies🤳 based on their favourite book characters: https://tinyurl.com/y2t7o43c

– free World Book activities pack (including author interview and writing a character profile): https://tinyurl.com/yxg5yole

– 25-day reading challenge for kids: https://www.naturalbeachliving.com/reading-challenge-for-k…/

Have fun reading!

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Avengers mini-cards (speaking activity)

With Avengers: Endgame premiering this week, what better time to refresh your students’ knowledge about the Marvel cinematic universe?

Here’s a set of printable mini-cards especially designed in the Marvel colors to help your students engage on conversation on the topic of the Avengers movies and help them prepare for the latest one in this series. There is also a black&white version of the mini-cards included together with the suggested answers to the questions.

Have fun!

Work-related phrases and idioms – printable mini-cards

Here’s a handout that you can use to supplement work-related vocabulary in your lessons. It can be used with intermediate students, but I think it might work at the pre-intermediate level as well.

Basically, all you need to do is print this sheet on card, cut the mini-cards and use them to play vocabulary games.

Download the handout here:

Gap-fill – Chances – Backstreet Boys

ChancesDunno about you, but I’ve been listening to the new Backstreet Boys hit – Chances – on repeat these last few days. And this is how I realised this is a great song to help students notice third conditional past perfect forms! Amazing, I know: ).
I’ve made a gap-fill that you can use in class for a (fun) listening activity. Check it out!
Download here: Chances.
Have fun teaching!

Should / Shouldn’t (giving advice)

doctor
photo: pixabay.com

Here’s a prescription template that you can print and use in the classroom. If you’re teaching primary students, this might come in handy in a lesson on how to give advice using SHOULD and SHOULDN’T.

Pair up students and have them role play a doctor-patient dialogue using this prescription template to guide them.

Download printable here: Prescription.

Happy teaching!

Make Giant Dice

Make Giant DiceToday I’m hosting an activity shared by education.com. It looks great for kindergarten kids who are learning to count and read numbers. Take a look. Have you tried it already?

Why Dice?

Dice are the main feature of lots of “grownup” games, but guess what? They’re a big part of kindergarten, too, and they can be great for learning. In early grades, kids often use dice as they learn both to count and to read number words. The dots on each side of the die give a clear visual picture of what each number represents, and kids can easily see the “one to one correspondence” between abstract numbers and the concrete things they show. At the same time, kids also need to match numbers to words, so that if they see “one,” or “two,” they can instantly recognize what they’re seeing. Here’s a great activity to put it all together—and create a marvelous game piece for outdoor play while you’re at it.

What You Need:
Clean, empty ½ gallon milk cartons
Hobby knife, such as an X-Acto knife
Tape
Round white stickers (available at office supply stores)
Black permanent marker
Craft glue
Clear contact paper
Construction paper

What You Do:
1. First, use the knife to cut off the bottom of your milk carton to create a cube that is exactly as high as it is wide.
2. Cut the slanted top off the remaining part of the milk carton, and cut a slit in one corner of the four-sided column that remains. Flatten the sides, and cut a long strip.
3. Wrap the strip around the open top of your milk carton, and tape it securely on all exposed sides.
4. Now measure and cut your construction paper into two strips that are three “squares” long and one square high.
5. Glue the strips onto the cubes.
6. Now, you have a blank die. Have your kindergartner help you write the word for each number along a corresponding side of the die, from “one” to “six.” Then have her paste on the corresponding number of stickers.
7. Cover the whole cube with clear contact paper, and make sure you reinforce all seams. You will have an all-weather, all-fun die that you can use for all sorts of games, and all sorts of math and reading, too.

Make Dice 1

Thanks again to education.com for sharing this activity. For more reading activities, take a look here: https://www.education.com/games/ela/reading.

Happy learning!