Make Giant Dice

Make Giant DiceToday I’m hosting an activity shared by education.com. It looks great for kindergarten kids who are learning to count and read numbers. Take a look. Have you tried it already?

Why Dice?

Dice are the main feature of lots of “grownup” games, but guess what? They’re a big part of kindergarten, too, and they can be great for learning. In early grades, kids often use dice as they learn both to count and to read number words. The dots on each side of the die give a clear visual picture of what each number represents, and kids can easily see the “one to one correspondence” between abstract numbers and the concrete things they show. At the same time, kids also need to match numbers to words, so that if they see “one,” or “two,” they can instantly recognize what they’re seeing. Here’s a great activity to put it all together—and create a marvelous game piece for outdoor play while you’re at it.

What You Need:
Clean, empty ½ gallon milk cartons
Hobby knife, such as an X-Acto knife
Tape
Round white stickers (available at office supply stores)
Black permanent marker
Craft glue
Clear contact paper
Construction paper

What You Do:
1. First, use the knife to cut off the bottom of your milk carton to create a cube that is exactly as high as it is wide.
2. Cut the slanted top off the remaining part of the milk carton, and cut a slit in one corner of the four-sided column that remains. Flatten the sides, and cut a long strip.
3. Wrap the strip around the open top of your milk carton, and tape it securely on all exposed sides.
4. Now measure and cut your construction paper into two strips that are three “squares” long and one square high.
5. Glue the strips onto the cubes.
6. Now, you have a blank die. Have your kindergartner help you write the word for each number along a corresponding side of the die, from “one” to “six.” Then have her paste on the corresponding number of stickers.
7. Cover the whole cube with clear contact paper, and make sure you reinforce all seams. You will have an all-weather, all-fun die that you can use for all sorts of games, and all sorts of math and reading, too.

Make Dice 1

Thanks again to education.com for sharing this activity. For more reading activities, take a look here: https://www.education.com/games/ela/reading.

Happy learning!

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Weather flashcards (VYLs)

rainyHello again! Hope your spring break was awesome! And relaxing! And sunny!: )

It’s back to school here tomorrow and to help you prepare, especially if you’re teaching VYLs, my teacher friend (and my VYL go-to expert) Eugenia  has come up with four lovely weather flashcards to help keep the little kids engaged while talking about the atmospheric conditions: ).

Click below to download (.pdf version):
rainysnowysunnywindy.

So if you’re thinking of teaching “windy”, “rainy”, “sunny” and “snowy”, these cute cards may be of help. Also, the kids can name the character in the flashcards, and they can describe his clothes and other extra features (what he is holding or where he is or how he’s feeling or how he looks like).

As usual, any feedback is more than welcome!:)

Have fun teaching! 🏫✍🏼 ☕️✏️📚

Sharing is caring!

*Vectors source: http://www.freepik.com/

Recent whiteboard work

ELT planning

I mentioned a few whiteboard tips this time last year. I should probably follow my own advice, because my recent whiteboard work has been a bit shoddy.

I’ve been taking some pictures of my recent boards. I won’t post them up in full – I’m embarrassed that I actually make quite a few spelling mistakes. I’m working on that.

Here’s a snippet of one though… this made me chuckle. It must have been an interesting gap year this student was having…

blog-2d

Haha!

Among the abundance of scribbles and poor organisation, I have come across a few useful things. Obviously, if you’re taking pictures of your own board then you consciously try to make things neat or clear – some of these are recent things I’ve tried out so do let me know if you think they’re a bit rubbish!

Marking opposites

I’m surprised I didn’t mention this in my…

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Battleships: A PowerPoint adaptation

tekhnologic

The other day I was reading this post by Svetlana Kandybovich. The post was a list of the 10 most popular games from ELT-CATION, and one of the games on that list was Battleships.

I was looking at the game and thinking that not only had it been awhile since I last made a PowerPoint game, but Battleships would be relatively easy to make in PowerPoint.

So, I turned on my computer and started designing.

This is what I produced:

Battleships.PNG

A single slide with letters on the vertical axis, numbers on the horizontal axis and the interior of slide is able to contain 35 words. The words don’t have to be unique vocabulary items; the board can contain duplicates.

Beneath the words are hidden ships that your students have to locate.

Take a look at this tutorial video to see how to use the template. The board used in the…

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Last Day of Term: Top 5 Quiz

Tim's Free English Lesson Plans

Image credit: www.drupal.org

Follow me on twitter @RobbioDobbio

The last day of term is fast approaching so I’ve made a fun quiz to keep students entertained bring sweets as prizes for the winning team. Credit to my friend Dan for the inspiration and some of the questions. Download the questions and instructions below:

top-5-quiz

Instructions

Spilt students into groups of 2 or 3, give each group a piece of paper and encourage them to come up with an interesting team name. Explain that you are going to give the teams a category and they have 3 minutes to come up with the top 5 items in that category. For example: the top 5 largest countries in the world by area. Students are awarded 1 point for every answer that they guess that appears in the top 5, and an additional bonus ½ point for every answer that is in…

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18 more ways to introduce your lesson topic

ELT planning

This term I’ve tried out a few different ways to introduce a lesson. These ones have worked well. They might be worth reading if you’ve exhausted my previous list!

  1. Song lyric gap fill

Example: 3rd conditional, regrets

Do a short gap fill on part of a song related to your topic. Mine was on some lines from Frank Sinatra’s My Way:

Regrets, I’ve had a few… (1.19 – 1.30)

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