What’s the matter?

PhotoHere’s a prescription printable that you can use for doctor-patient role-plays with Movers. There’s two of them on one page so hopefully that helps with the printing.

Download the handout here: Prescription.

It’s a pretty basic form but it will help the “doctors” ask the right questions and give and record the advice.

Structures that could be used in the lesson:
What’s your name?
How old are you?
What’s your address?
What’s the matter?
Where does it hurt?
Here are some pills for…
You should eat/drink/exercise…

I have some plastic stethoscopes (like the one in the photo above) that I usually use for this kind of lesson. The kids love them and they have a lot of fun giving consultations.

Hope you find this useful.
Have fun teaching!
👩‍🏫

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Ice Age: The Great Egg-Scapade handouts

The_Great_Egg-Scapade
Photo source: iceage.wikia.com

We’re celebrating Easter on Sunday here in Romania so this week is all about Easter-related activities.

Ice Age: The Great Egg-Scapade is only 20 minutes or so so you can fit it nicely into one of your lessons this week. Here’s the trailer.

To get kids more familiar with the characters, use this handout: EggScapadeCharacters. It’s a simple matching exercise and it helps them remember/learn the names of the animals in the story. Then you can have them guess the order in which certain events happen using this handout: OrderEvents. You can cut the stripes of paper beforehand or have them cut them in class. After they watch the short film, they check to see if they guessed the right order.

I also came up with some questions especially for my KET students (they’re quite strong learners). You can find them below:

  1. Who’s your favourite Ice Age character? Why?
  2. Imagine you lived in the Ice Age. What would you wear? What would you eat? Where would you live?
  3. Would you rather be more like Manny or more like Diego? Why?
  4. Have you ever seen an egg hatching?
  5. Have you ever been on an egg hunt? How many eggs did you find?

I hope you’ll find all this useful. I’d love to get any feedback on the handouts.

Like&share!

🌱🌱🌱

Easter Board Game (Movers level)

1Hello! Since we’re going to celebrate Easter this weekend here in Romania and the kids (and the teachers!) are a couple of days away from a two-week spring break (oh-god-yes), I thought I’d make an Easter-related board game that involves more movement and is hopefully more fun. Also, this time it’s in Word, so you can edit it if you want.

So without further ado, here it is: Easter Board Game finalI plan on using it with my stronger Movers. Hope they’ll have fun with it.

Well, that’s it. Don’t forget to like and share and if you have any suggestions, I’d be more than happy to read them.

Have a great spring!🌼🌼🌼

 

Past Tense Practice

Here are some cards that you can cut and use to revise Wh- questions in the past. You can first ask your students to write down the questions using the words on the mini-cards, give some feedback and then use the questions to start a conversation in pairs or small groups.

Download here: Questions Past.

Happy teaching & enjoy the summer!🏝🏝🏝 🌞 🌞 🌞

Alma

summer
source: pinterest

 

Present Perfect Board Game

HaveYouEverHere’s a board game that I use with adults to consolidate the use of Present Perfect when talking about personal experience. I included the black & white version as well: HaveYouEver.

As a follow-up, they can write the answer to one of these questions developing it into a story.

Happy teaching!🍀🍀🍀

Like and share if you find this useful. Thanks; ).

Cards – Irregular verbs

IrregularVbsCardsUse these to review or consolidate the past tense simple of irregular verbs.

Download here (black & white version only – for now: ): IrregularVbsCards.

Happy teaching!❄️❄️❄️

The thing I like about…

CardsI was inspired in coming up with this activity by a lesson in Face2Face Upper-Intermediate (p. 84) on introductory phrases that emphasize what we are going to say next.

After you have taught and practised the phrases (you will find them on the third page of the handout below), cut the squares from the first page (or the second if you print them in color), shuffle them and have the student pick one randomly and write or say something that incorporates the word on the card and one of the introductory phrases. Then you can actually turn this into a conversation by asking follow-up questions about the situation mentioned by the student.

Let me know how it goes.

Happy learning!: )

Download the materials by clicking here: Introductory Phrases for emphasis.